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NASCAR Cup: ‘cone rule’ idea thrown around after Bristol

The No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet of Jimmie Johnson on pit road at Bristol Motor Speedway on Aug. 19, 2017 (photo courtesy of Getty Images for NASCAR).

The No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet of Jimmie Johnson on pit road at Bristol Motor Speedway on Aug. 19, 2017 (photo courtesy of Getty Images for NASCAR).

By AMANDA VINCENT

In the days since Saturday night’s running the Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series event at Bristol (Ten.) Motor Speedway a hot topic of conversation, even some debate, is the feasibility of a “cone rule” in NASCAR at short track races to prevent the type of gamesmanship seen on pit road at Bristol in which drivers would slow in exiting the pits in an effort to restart in an even spot, in the outside line. Denny Hamlin’s attempt to do so late in the race at Bristol was the most obvious Saturday night.

“That’s something we don’t want, because we don’t need accidents at the end of the pit road with people checking up,” NASCAR Senior Vice President of Competition Scott Miller said on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio on Monday. “We’ll figure out how we’re going to address that one and try to move on. Really, it kind of only comes into play at a few places. We know when it’s possibly going to happen, so we’ll try to address that.”

The “cone rule” is widely implemented in local short track racing in which a cone is placed on the track during cautions, and drivers may choose which lane they want to restart in and driving by the cone on the right or left, depending on that choice. Strategy comes into play, as it may enable drivers in the back to restart closer to the front by choosing the less popular lane.

“As we do here at NASCAR, we’re constantly looking at ways to make the races and the action for the fans more interesting. That is a topic that we have discussed a little bit,” Miller said. “But we talk about a lot of things, and when the final decision comes, I’m not sure what that will be, but certainly, it has been a topic of discussion.”

Hamlin wasn’t the first driver to try such gamesmanship, which by the way, didn’t work out for him Saturday night when other drivers tried the same strategy, and Saturday night’s Bristol race wasn’t the first in which such a strategy has been tried, sometimes successfully, sometimes not.

Follow Auto Racing Daily on Twitter @AutoRacingDaily or like Auto Racing Daily on Facebook (facebook.com/autorcngdaily). Amanda’s also on Twitter @NASCARexaminer and has a fan/like page on Facebook (facebook.com/nascarexaminer)

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Posted by on August 22, 2017. Filed under Breaking News,Featured,NASCAR. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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