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NASCAR Cup: Kyle Busch thinks aero package ‘sucks’ at Dover

during practice for the NASCAR Xfinity Series Production Alliance Group 300 at Auto Club Speedway on March 15, 2019 in Fontana, California.

By AMANDA VINCENT

The 2019 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series aerodynamic rules package, specifically the variation of it used at Dover (Del.) International Speedway for Monday’s Gander RV 400, received criticism from some participants. The most vocal critics were driver Kyle Busch and Leavine Family Racing owner Bob Leavine.

“The package sucks. No f***ing question about it. It’s terrible,” Busch said. “All I can do is bitch about it and fall on deaf ears and we’ll come back with the same thing it in the fall.”

Busch finished 10th, continuing a streak of 11 top-10 finishes in the first 11 races of the season.

Leavine concurred via Twitter with Busch’s complaint.

“Let me second @KyleBusch statement, this package sucks,” Leavine (@BLeavine) tweeted. “Has nothing to do with where he finished.”

The variation of the aero rules package used at Dover gave cars 750 hp and higher downforce. The result was increased speed. Five drivers surpassed the old track record in qualifying, and more than 20 cars exceeding the track qualifying record in opening practice.

“You pretty much know as a driver what too fast is,” 2015 champion Kyle Busch said Friday. “If you have a problem here with the speeds we are carrying into the corner, it is going to hurt. The faster you go, the harder you are going to hit the wall. The IndyCar guys were flying around here, and they don’t come here anymore, because it was too fast, too dangerous for them. Eventually, there comes a point where it becomes too fast for a stock car too. Whether that is or not, I guess that is people other than myself to think, but I would much rather appreciate racing and being able to race at a more tolerable speed than we are going right now.”

Most of the criticism was that the higher speeds made passing difficult.

“It was definitely really hard to pass,” Martin Truex Jr. said. “There’s no question about that. I got stuck behind lapped cars multiple times. If you were running the bottom and they were running a lane up, you were good. If they decided just to cut to the bottom in front of you and shut your air off, you about drive into the fence off the corner. It’s tough.”

Kevin Harvick also commented after the race on passing difficulty. He finished fourth.

“As you look at the cars behind each other, especially there at the end, there was hardly anybody who could pass anybody,” Harvick said. “You lose so much downforce behind each other every week that, from a driver’s standpoint, it becomes frustration. It’s difficult to maneuver your car to make up positions, because they become so aero-bad behind each other. Our guys on our Jimmy John’s Ford did a good job today, we just got super tight the last run stuck behind the 42 (Kyle Larson). We just couldn’t go anywhere.”

Truex won the race after starting in the back, while Alex Bowman finished second after also starting in the back. Truex and Bowman were two of four drivers moved to the back for the start of the race because of multiple pre-race inspection failures. Also worth noting, Monday’s race included the second-most green-flag passes in a Cup race at Dover in the last six years.

“If you look at the package, no matter what we’ve put out there, drivers always say it’s hard to pass, and our comment back to that has always been that these are the best drivers in the world and it’s going to be hard to pass,” NASCAR Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer Steve O’Donnell told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio on Tuesday.

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Posted by on May 8, 2019. Filed under Breaking News,Featured,Monster Energy NASCAR Cup,NASCAR. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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