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NASCAR Cup: Ryan Newman in serious condition after Daytona 500 crash

during practice for the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Folds of Honor Quiktrip 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway on February 22, 2019 in Hampton, Georgia.

By AMANDA VINCENT

Ryan Newman is in serious condition with non-life-threatening injuries after his involvement in a last-lap crash in the Daytona 500 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on Monday.

“Ryan Newman is being treated at Hilifax Medical Center,” read a statement from Roush Fenway Racing, released Monday night. “He is in serious condition, but doctors have indicated his injuries are not life-threatening. We appreciate your thoughts and prayers and ask that you respect the privacy of Ryan and his family during this time. We appreciate your patience and cooperation, and we will provide more information as it becomes available.”

Newman was leading as the race field approached the checkered flag after two overtime restarts for two multi-car crashes. He received a push from Ryan Blaney.

“I hope he’s all right,” Blaney said. “That looked really bad and not something you want to do. Definitely unintentional. I was just committing to pushing him to the win once he blocked a couple times, was kind of beat. Just hope Ryan’s all right. It sucks to lose a race, but you never want to see anyone get hurt.”

Newman’s car then hit the wall, got airborne and flipped, landing on its roof. Then, Corey Lajoie, unable to see where he was going, hit Newman’s car near the driver-side window.

“I got a big push there that last coming to the white,” LaJoie said. “I don’t know who was pushing me, and I kind of stalled out, and I don’t know who hooked Newman. I was hoping he would kind of bounce off the fence to the left, but he didn’t, and I hit him. I don’t know exactly where I hit him. I haven’t seen a replay. It was some scary stuff. Don’t get me wrong. My car was on fire. My seat belts grabbed all sorts of areas, but it was a good day for us. I hope Ryan is okay.”

After the race, safety personnel turned Newman’s car upright. black screens were placed around the car to obstruct viewing of his extrication from the car and pit road was cleared before Newman was pulled from his car and transported by ambulance to the hospital.

Denny Hamlin won the Daytona 500 for the second-consecutive year, his third-career Daytona 500 win. Hamlin was heavily criticized for celebrating his win, but stated later he was unaware of the seriously of Newman’s situation.

“First and foremost I want to give well wishes and prayeers to @RyanJNewman,” Hamlin (@DennyHamlin) tweeted. “I had absolutely NO IDEA of the severity of the crash until I got to victory lane. There’s very little communication after the finish and I had already unhooked my radio. It’s not anyone’s fault. (Praying hands emjoji) Rocket.”

Hamlin’s victory lane was somewhat subdued, and afterward, his car owner, Joe Gibbs, apologized for the celebration by the No. 11 Joe Gibbs Racing team.

“I knew that there was a (wreck), but I never even focused over there (by Newman’s car),” Gibbs said. “I was focused on our car, and everybody started celebrating it around us. So I said to everybody out there, some people may have saw us and said, ‘Well, these guys are celebrating when there’s this serious issue going on.’ So I apologize to everybody, but we really didn’t know. We got in the winner’s circle, and that’s when people told us later.”

Hamlin’s crew chief Chris Lambert apologized via a series of tweets (@3widemiddle) for the post-race celebrating, taking responsibility for not relaying the seriousness of Newman’s condition to Hamlin.

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Posted by on February 18, 2020. Filed under Breaking News,Cup Series,Featured,NASCAR. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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