What does NASCAR racing entail?

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FORT WORTH, TEXAS - SEPTEMBER 25: Daniel Suarez, driver of the #99 Aguas Frescas Chevrolet, and Austin Dillon, driver of the #3 True Velocity Chevrolet, race during the NASCAR Cup Series Auto Trader EchoPark Automotive 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on September 25, 2022 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)
FORT WORTH, TEXAS – SEPTEMBER 25: Daniel Suarez, driver of the #99 Aguas Frescas Chevrolet, and Austin Dillon, driver of the #3 True Velocity Chevrolet, race during the NASCAR Cup Series Auto Trader EchoPark Automotive 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on September 25, 2022 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

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NASCAR, short for National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, is the organization that regulates stock car racing in the United States and Canada. It was established in 1948 in Daytona Beach, Florida, and its efforts helped make stock car racing one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States by the turn of the millennium. And even though there are many ways you can have fun nowadays, including checking out the offers at 365 betting, and keep yourself occupied, watching NASCAR races certainly tops the list.

Bill France, an auto technician and occasional racing car driver, was instrumental in establishing NASCAR in the late 1940s. In 1947, following multiple failed efforts to develop a series of races that would decide a national champion, France launched the National Championship Stock Car Circuit (NCSCC), a yearlong series of 40 events contested throughout the southern United States. 

How fast do the NASCAR cars go?

Average NASCAR cars can reach the speed of about 321 kilometers per hour (or around 200 miles per hour). When compared to a Formula 1 vehicle, which can reach speeds of up to 360 km/h (223mph), this is noticeably slower. Another popular American racing series, IndyCar, can reach speeds of up to 380 kilometers per hour (236mph).

Acceleration-wise, NASCAR vehicles can go from 0 to 96 km/h in 3.4 seconds. The Formula 1 cars can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 2.6 seconds, whereas the IndyCar cars take 3 seconds.

True, Formula 1 and IndyCar cars are designed for speed, which is important to keep in mind. In contrast, NASCAR vehicles use modified versions of stock chassis to achieve record-breaking speeds.

Types of NASCAR racing tracks

Throughout the course of the 36 races that make up a NASCAR season, drivers will see four distinct kinds of racing tracks. Among them are speedways, superspeedways, short tracks, and road tracks. Okay, but what exactly are the distinctions? How, exactly, can you tell a Speedway apart from a Superspeedway?

Traditional speedways are between one and two miles in length. Martinsville Speedway is a D-shaped or paperclip-shaped racetrack. A Superspeedway, such as Daytona or Talladega, has more length, width, and allows more speed than a regular racetrack. Superspeedway races thus usually result in faster speeds and more thrilling competitions.

Short tracks refer to oval tracks that are shorter than one mile in length. There is less space for drivers to pass one another since, as the name suggests, these tracks are both shorter in length and narrower.

NASCAR’s last race track type is a road track. Circuit of the Americas hosted a race in 2021; it is one of the series’ more “classic” courses. 

What are the NASCAR races like?

Stage racing was first done in 2017. However, this type of race is not a continuous one. Instead of lasting uninterrupted from start to finish, the race has been divided into three phases in order to increase the tension and excitement. 

Generally speaking, stage racing is believed to be more exciting for spectators since there are more first and last laps.
 

In summary, NASCAR races are an exciting event to spend your time enjoying.